January 7, 2013

Kitchen Adventures: Bibingkang Kanin

I taught this one my father. However, he doesn’t teach me how to do it but I just observed him how to cook this one. I am on my elementary days that time when we cooked this one for New Year’s Eve and now I am the one who does for New Year’s Eve.

You need:
¾ kilo glutinous rice
5 cups coconut milk
¼ kilo brown sugar
½ cup butter
2 tbsp. vanilla

For the topping:
3 cups coconut milk
¼ kilo brown sugar
2 tbsp. vanilla

Here’s what to do:
Cook the glutinous rice in 5 cups of coconut milk. Just like cooking ordinary rice. After the rice has been cooked, dissolve ¼ kilo brown sugar in 6 cups of water, add 2 tbsps. vanilla and let it boil. Add the cooked rice and butter. Continue stirring them for about thirty minutes or until it become sticky.  Set aside. (I bet you will get your biceps work here)

For the toppings:
Mix all the ingredients and cook in low fire stirring continuously until it becomes thick.

In a rectangular pan, grease all side with melted butter. Put the cooked rice and level it leaving space for the topping. Pour in the topping.

Put the rice with topping in a leveled surface. Place another pan with a size bit larger than the first one on top and place burning charcoal. Keep the charcoals burning for at least 30 minutes or until the topping dried or turned dark brown. Just like cooking the traditional bibingka.

Cut into about 1.5in x 1.5in using greased (using butter) knife and serve.

1. Keep on stirring the glutinous rice to prevent burning and sticking on the pan. Better to use iron cast pan than Teflon coated ones. The more you stir it, the more it gets sticky and even more delicious.
2. Use low fire in cooking the topping mixture to prevent from creating froth.
3. Regulate the charcoal to prevent the topping to let it dried without getting 
4. You may add shredded coconut meat in the glutinous rice mixture.
5. If you can find sinuklob or minatamis na bao in the market, this can be used as replacement for brown sugar.